Johnny Manziel Appeal Rating Drops 50 Percent According to Just-Released Survey

College football superstar Johnny Manziel has fallen from the good graces of the American public, according to a just-released survey by E-Score®.

In a survey completed this week, only 49 percent of respondents indicated they found Manziel appealing, significantly lower than the 87 percent average for the 1,400 athletes tracked. Data from a survey conducted in January 2013, just after Manziel’s Heisman win, shows 97 percent of respondents found him appealing. While Manziel suffered a decrease in appeal of 50 percent during the past 8 months, the survey also showed his awareness went up 67 percent during the same time period.

When asked to choose from a list of attributes describing Manziel, respondents selected rude, 27 percent; overexposed, 43 percent; and insincere, 19 percent. These numbers increased dramatically from the prior survey, which showed the number of respondents selecting those attributes as being significantly lower (rude, 2 percent; overexposed, 5 percent; insincere, 5 percent).


E-Score surveyed 1,100 persons with general representation across income, age, education and geographic demographics to represent a cross-section of the U.S. population.

“It’s apparent the recent autograph incident with the NCAA and on-field grandstanding has taken him out of the public’s favor,” said Gerry Philpott, president of E-Poll Market Research. “While this may not impact his ability as a player, it most certainly will have a huge consequence as far as future endorsement deals and his financial worth as a professional athlete.”

E-Score is a leading consumer research service that provides information to media and entertainment companies. E-Score is produced by E-Poll Market Research, a full service consumer research company that provides quantitative and qualitative research to media, entertainment and Fortune 1,000 companies. E-Poll was founded in 1997 and is headquartered in Los Angeles. More information is available at


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